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'Just-in-time shipping is the smart thing to do'

Communicating berth times earlier could reduce carbon emissions, advocates say

'Just-in-time shipping is the smart thing to do'
03 July 2020 - 12:39 - Update: 03 July 2020 - 13:07

At the first meeting three years ago of the Global Industry Alliance (GIA), a partnership of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and 14 companies dedicated to decarbonizing shipping, shipowners complained about their vessels waiting days to weeks at anchorage before being able to call at port.

So said Astrid Dispert, the technical manager of GreenVoyage2050, a joint project of the IMO and the Norwegian government to steer the shipping industry toward a lower-carbon future, during a Tuesday webinar, “Improving Efficiency in the Ship-port Interface.”

Argyris Stasinakis, an executive partner with MarineTraffic, which put on the webinar, backed up Dispert’s anecdote with the results of a study his company had conducted that showed cargo vessels on average spend nearly 30 days a year just waiting to enter port.

A Global Maritime Energy Efficiency Partnerships (GloMEEP) video shown during the webinar said the maritime industry emits about 1 billion tons of CO2 each year and that “just-in-time sailing could be part of the solution to significantly reduce [carbon emissions]. Eliminating unnecessary early arrivals at the port would enable ships to sail slower and consume less fuel,” the narrator said. 

“Not knowing when the previous ship will leave is a major obstacle,” he continued. “Currently the terminal and other service providers share very few updates about completion times. Because of this uncertainty, the departing ship cannot inform the port authority of its departure time until these services are near completion.”

According to the video, ships today receive berthing information about two hours before arrival, when the ship is in radio range. 

“Sharing updates earlier and more frequently would allow an incoming ship to adjust its sailing speed much earlier and sail a lot more efficiently. Even a modest speed reduction of 10% can result in a 30% reduction of CO2 emissions. Just-in-time sailing is the smart thing to do. It is the sustainable thing to do,” the narrator said. 

Source: FreightWaves (cilick for futher of the article)

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