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Wartsila says its scrubbers will tackle maritime CO2 emissions

WARTSILA Exhaust Treatment can provide exhaust gas abatement and directly tackle maritime carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions as technological advances now enables manufacturers to design and upgrade scrubbers to capture carbon at the point of exhaust

22 March 2021 - 19:00
WARTSILA Exhaust Treatment can provide exhaust gas abatement and directly tackle maritime carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions as technological advances now enables manufacturers to design and upgrade scrubbers to capture carbon at the point of exhaust.

'Carbon capture and storage, enabled by scrubbers, must take a central role within the suite of solutions helping to drive decarbonisation in shipping, including alternative fuels and efficiency technologies,' said a company press release. As there is not only one single solution on shipping's environmental impact, the sector must innovate broadly across multiple areas,' it said.



Wartsila has conducted extensive research and development to explore how carbon capture and storage (CCS) can be developed and scaled in maritime.



Initial findings show that CCS on ships is technically viable for the sector to pursue. To further accelerate development, Wartsila is installing a 1MW pilot plant at its test facility in Moss, Norway. This pilot plant will allow Wartsila to test its CCS technologies in a range of scenarios and conditions.



'Building on the success of existing and well-proven technologies, such as scrubbers, will be vital to succeeding on the industry's decarbonisation goals,' said Wartsila exhaust treatment director Sigurd Jenssen. 'Exhaust gas abatement technologies have reached a point of maturity where it is only right that we explore their wider applications beyond sulphur compliance,' he said.



Given the scale of the decarbonisation challenge ahead, Wartsila Exhaust Treatment believes there is no better place to focus efforts than on the biggest emission of them all - carbon - and think about the ways that we can use what we have already learned from sulphur, both as an organisation and as an industry.


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