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US prosecutors charge Huawei with theft of secrets, bank fraud

US prosecutors has charged Shenzhen's Huawei Technologies with theft of trade secrets from an American rival and bank fraud by violating sanctions against dealings with Iran

US prosecutors charge Huawei with theft of secrets, bank fraud

US prosecutors has charged Shenzhen's Huawei Technologies with theft of trade secrets from an American rival and bank fraud by violating sanctions against dealings with Iran

30 January 2019 - 19:00

US prosecutors has charged Shenzhen's Huawei Technologies with theft of trade secrets from an American rival and bank fraud by violating sanctions against dealings with Iran.

Reputed to be China's biggest technology firm, Huawei has been the target of a broad US crackdown, including allegations it sold telecommunications equipment that could be used by the Communist Party for spying, Bloomberg reports.



Charges increase tensions between the two economic giant, now engaged in a trade war that has upset markets.



In a 13-count indictment in Brooklyn, New York, the government alleged Huawei, two affiliated companies and its chief financial officer, Meng Wanzhou, of bank and wire fraud as well as conspiracy in connection with business in Iran.



Separately, charges filed in Washington state accuse the company of stealing trade secrets from T-Mobile USA and offering bonuses to employees who succeeded in getting technology from rivals.



The cases 'expose Huawei's brazen and persistent actions to exploit American companies and financial institutions, and to threaten the free and fair global marketplace,' said FBI agent in charge Christopher Wray.



Canada's justice department confirmed it received a formal request to extradite Meng to the US. Huawei denies wrongdoing.



Canada's justice minister now has up to 30 days to assess the US request and issue an 'authority to proceed' with hearings. The country has little leeway to refuse, assuming the alleged crimes she committed also violate Canadian law.



A hearing could still be months away, and Meng will have several opportunities to appeal. The final decision on extradition is up to Canada's justice minister.



Canadian judges end up approving about 90 per cent of extradition requests because the system makes it nearly impossible to mount a defence, says Gary Botting, a Vancouver-based lawyer who's been involved in hundreds of extradition cases.


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