Reklam
Reklam
Reklam
Reklam
Reklam

Switch to non-diesel trucks in Europe requires more charging, refuelling points

RADICAL policy changes are needed to encourage European fleet operators to invest in non-diesel trucks, according to the European Automobile Manufacturers' Association (ACEA) chairman Gerrit Marx

17 December 2019 - 19:00

RADICAL policy changes are needed to encourage European fleet operators to invest in non-diesel trucks, according to the European Automobile Manufacturers' Association (ACEA) chairman Gerrit Marx.

Mr Marx said that binding sales quotas for manufacturers would do nothing to encourage transport companies to purchase alternatively powered trucks, reported American Shipper.



'If we are to convince hauliers to make the switch to low- and zero-emission vehicles on a large-scale, Europe urgently needs to introduce a strong package of consistent and predictable policy measures,' he said.



'Creating real market demand for low- and zero-emission vehicles should now be the priority.'



ACEA called for the rapid roll-out of dedicated charging and refuelling infrastructure for trucks which it claims is 'completely absent' at present.



The organisation also said policy reforms should include 'meaningful incentives to make these vehicles a commercially viable and competitive choice for transport operators, thereby fostering fleet renewal.'



The European Union (EU) adopted its first-ever CO2 standards for heavy-duty vehicles earlier this year. They state that manufacturers must cut carbon dioxide emissions from new trucks on average by 15 per cent from 2025 and by 30 per cent from 2030, compared with 2019 levels.



ACEA said the new CO2 targets would 'oblige all manufacturers to focus on, and massively ramp up investments in, alternative powertrains.'



As well as chairing ACEA, Mr Marx is also the president of CNH Industrial, which earlier this week launched a new range of electric and hydrogen trucks aimed at the European market. The trucks will be built by its subsidiary IVECO and powered by Arizona-based Nikola Motor Company.



The partners claim the new designs have the potential to reduce driver turnover rates.



Electrically chargeable vehicles account for a negligible share of all trucks in circulation (0.01 per cent, or one out of every 10,000 vehicles), while 0.4 per cent of all trucks in the EU run on natural gas.


WORLD SHIPPING

This news 255 hits received.