Reklam
Reklam
Reklam
Reklam
Reklam

Hanjin Miami refused New York docking because of a dispute over empties

DESPITE finding the money to unload a full containers at sea outside of New York Harbour, the Hanjin Miami was refused dock because it didn't have a plan to return to sea,

Hanjin Miami refused New York docking because of a dispute over empties
23 September 2016 - 20:54

Hanjin Miami refused New York docking because of a dispute over empties
DESPITE finding the money to unload a full containers at sea outside of New York Harbour, the Hanjin Miami was refused dock because it didn't have a plan to return to sea, Reuters reports. 
The 7,455-TEU Hanjin Miami was not allowed in port because of a dispute about the carrier's empties, which the vessel would normally load up as ballast to exit port.
Without those empties, the ship will not be able to depart because it would not be low enough in the water to pass under the Bayonne Bridge, said Federal Maritime Commissioner William Doyle, whose agency regulates international shipping. Without a way to leave, the ship could tie up a berth.
"There are so many disputes right now attached to empty containers that the terminal is not going to load the empties back onto the ship," said Mr Doyle.
An attorney for Maher Terminal, which operates the marine terminal in Newark where the Hanjin Miami was expected to dock, declined to comment.
The Hanjin Miami is currently off the US east coast, about 480 kilometres from New York, according to Reuters Eikon data.
Other ports also are struggling with questions of who pays for terminal charges and what to do with empty containers. The complexity increased after a South Korean judge told Hanjin to cancel its ship charter agreements and return empty vessels to their owners.
In the wake of the decision by the South Korean judge, an empty Hanjin Miami may become the responsibility of Reederei NSB, which manages the ship on behalf of its owner, an affiliate of Conti Holding of Munich.
Port terminals, meanwhile, have stopped accepting returns of empty shipping containers because they doubt Hanjin will pay to store them.
"The Hanjin boxes are radioactive. Nobody wants to take responsibility for them," said chairman of the Los Angeles Customs Brokers & Freight Forwarders Association Inc, Mark Hirzel.
Attorney for Bermuda-based Textainer Group Holdings Ltd, Darren Azman, said cargo owners and other Hanjin parties are working out an agreement that they hope will normalise the movement of shipping containers.

This news 3517 hits received.

COMMENTS

  • 0 Comment