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Virus outbreak highlights the versatile use of shipping containers

SHIPPING containers can be turned into hospitals to treat COVID-19 patients, as demonstrated by the RUAG Field Hospital that was built by transforming 20-foot standard containers into two-bed intensive care units by an international team of architects and engineers

28 April 2020 - 19:00

SHIPPING containers can be turned into hospitals to treat COVID-19 patients, as demonstrated by the RUAG Field Hospital that was built by transforming 20-foot standard containers into two-bed intensive care units by an international team of architects and engineers.

It uses a combination of standard ISO shipping containers, along with expandable containers to build field hospitals in record time, reported Seatrade Maritime News, Colchester, UK.



Another design which has been given funding to develop its first prototype is named the CURA - Connected Units for Respiratory Ailments. In the same way in which pop-up shops and co-working spaces can be turned around quickly, the CURA sees all equipment and features of an intensive care unit placed inside a 20-foot container.



This can then be shipped or taken anywhere, and ready to help healthcare officials in mere hours. They have received funding to develop the first prototype and it's currently being manufactured in Italy.



Another global issue facing the healthcare system is providing temporary housing for hospital staff.



Three Squared is now offering its cargo containers as climate-controlled housing units for doctors and nurses to stay in, close to their patients, while also maintaining necessary social distancing and hygiene protocols, since they even have electrical and fully-equipped bathrooms in the state-of-the-art container dwellings.



Prisons have become a hotbed for Coronavirus contamination with prisoners at HMP Wymott in the UK needing to be transferred after a serious outbreak of Covid-19. In the UK, 500 temporary prison cells are being made from steel shipping containers, with more expected to be built if demand continues.



They will be built in a prefabricated manner into the grounds of seven prisons, in an effort to prevent the spread of the virus in these locations where it's harder to maintain social distancing. Work has begun on HMP North Sea Camp along with others in Moorland, Lindholme and Huber, according to the UK's Ministry of Justice.


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