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CH Robinson prepares for custom rule changes under Brexit

ADDITIONAL customs procedures triggered by the UK's exit from the European Union has prompted freight forwarder CH Robinson to prepare for any potential fall-out

CH Robinson prepares for custom rule changes under Brexit

ADDITIONAL customs procedures triggered by the UK's exit from the European Union has prompted freight forwarder CH Robinson to prepare for any potential fall-out

CH Robinson prepares for custom rule changes under Brexit
02 July 2018 - 19:06

ADDITIONAL customs procedures triggered by the UK's exit from the European Union has prompted freight forwarder CH Robinson to prepare for any potential fall-out.

Vice president global forwarding Ivo Aris was quoted as saying in a report by London's Air Cargo News: 'Every change, including Brexit, will bring along challenges but first and foremost presents opportunities for us.



'It will be interesting to see what impact Brexit will have on our customers' businesses. After all, forwarding and moving freight is a derived demand.



'It is expected that there will be more stringent customs requirements, which could have an impact on our business. It can bring us extra work. We welcome a smooth transition with minimal negative impact for our customers.'



On the challenge for freight forwarders from the giant e-tailers such as Amazon, Mr Aris said: 'We embrace e-commerce as this will be one of the drivers for air freight growth in the future. Change in general is good for the air freight forwarding industry. It brings innovative players with new opportunities for healthy growth.'



The company handled 57,300 tonnes of European import and export cargo in 2017 and is forecast to process 66,000 tonnes this year, an increase of 15 per cent. The ratio was 70 per cent belly hold and the remainder main deck cargo.



Asked about the impact of slot congestion at European airports, Mr Aris said: 'Congestion across the main ports in Europe has certainly had an impact on our business. It is a more fundamental problem related to infrastructure.



'A lot needs to happen to make sure that the main ports are ready for future growth. Freighter slots in Amsterdam also had an impact. We have seen disruption in the supply chain, mostly driven by delays and getting used to the new setup by the carriers.



He continued: 'Now that the handling and road feeder services are fully up and running and everybody is used to the new setup - feeding from outer airports/cross border - it is running much smoother again.'

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