Reklam
Reklam
Reklam
Reklam
Reklam
Reklam
Reklam

Cargill to test wind-assisted shipping on newbuilds and retrofits

US TRADING firm Cargill will test wind propulsion technology on a number of new-build oil product tankers and dry bulk carriers in an effort to cut carbon dioxide emissions, reports London's Argus Media

04 November 2020 - 19:00

US TRADING firm Cargill will test wind propulsion technology on a number of new-build oil product tankers and dry bulk carriers in an effort to cut carbon dioxide emissions, reports London's Argus Media.

The project will utilise sail-design firm Bar Technologies' WindWings - solid wing sales up to 45 metres high, initially on nine product tankers and then on 12 dry-bulk carriers.



These will probably be Kamsamax-class or similar - Kamsamaxes are typically between 80,000-85,000 dwt and used to transport iron ore, coal and grain.



All 21 vessels will be newbuildings, but Technologies said it is considering the retrofitting wing sails on older vessels. The number of wing sails will be tailored to the size of the vessel and the route it will take.



The project entered its design phase with the first vessels expected to be delivered by 2022.



The technology could reduce CO2 emissions from bulk cargo ships by 30pc, which would go some way toward meeting the UN's International Maritime Organisation (IMO) target for a 40pc CO2 reduction from shipping by 2030 and a 70pc cut by 2050, both compared with 2008 levels.



Changing regulations and uncertainty about future greener marine fuels makes choosing the right vessel to charter with a long-term view complicated, said Cargill ocean transport chief Jan Dieleman.



Cargill has already partnered with a number of entities to explore how to decarbonise the shipping industry, including the Global Maritime Forum - and Getting to Zero Coalition - and the Sea Cargo Charter.


SeaNews Turkey

This news 452 hits received.

COMMENTS

  • 0 Comment